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Victimology
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Victimology
A Comprehensive Approach

Second Edition
Additional resources:


January 2019 | 432 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc
Drawing from the most up-to-date research and emerging issues, Victimology: A Comprehensive Approach is an accessible, student-friendly text that provides students with an overview of the causes and consequences of victimization and the responses to those causes. Renowned authors and researchers Leah E. Daigle and Lisa R. Muftic use a consistent framework throughout to help readers understand why people are victimized, as well as how the criminal justice system and other social services interact with victims and each other. The focus on causes and responses equips students with the foundational knowledge needed to apply key concepts to real-life situations. Emphasizing the impact of trauma on individuals and opportunities for prevention, this supportive text offers incisive discussions of recurring victimization and the victim-offender overlap with a global focus. The streamlined Second Edition explores emerging topics within this growing field, including immigration and victimization, bullying, homicides and sexual assaults involving LGBTQ persons, school shootings, and more.
 
Preface
 
Acknowledgments
 
About the Authors
 
Chapter 1 • Introduction to Victimology
What Is Victimology?

 
The History of Victimology: Before the Victims’ Rights Movement

 
Victimology Across the Globe

 
The Role of the Victim in Crime: Victim Precipitation, Victim Facilitation, and Victim Provocation

 
The History of Victimology: The Victims’ Rights Movement

 
Contributions of the Victims’ Rights Movement

 
Victimology Today

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 2 • Extent, Theories, and Factors of Victimization
Measuring Victimization

 
Theories and Explanations of Victimization

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 3 • The Victim–Offender Overlap
The Link Between Victimization and Offending

 
Explaining the Link Between Victimization and Offending

 
The Victim–Offender Overlap and Specific Types of Victimization

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 4 • Consequences of Victimization
Physical Consequences

 
Psychological Consequences

 
Behavioral Reactions

 
Economic Costs

 
System Costs

 
Vicarious Victimization

 
Reporting

 
Fear of Crime

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 5 • Recurring Victimization
Types of Recurring Victimization

 
Extent of Recurring Victimization

 
Characteristics of Recurring Victimization

 
Risk Factors for Recurring Victimization

 
Theoretical Explanations of Recurring Victimization

 
Consequences of Recurring Victimization

 
Focus on Research

 
Prevention

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 6 • Victims’ Rights and Remedies
Victims’ Rights

 
Financial Remedy

 
Remedies and Rights in Court

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 7 • Homicide Victimization
Defining Homicide Victimization

 
Measurement and Extent of Homicide Victimization

 
Risk Factors for and Characteristics of Homicide Victimization

 
Different Types of Homicide Victimization

 
Victim Precipitation

 
Indirect (Secondary) Victimization

 
Legal and Community Responses to Homicide Victimization

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 8 • Sexual Victimization
What Is Sexual Victimization?

 
Measurement and Extent of Sexual Victimization

 
Risk Factors for and Characteristics of Sexual Victimization

 
Responses to Sexual Victimization

 
Consequences of Sexual Victimization

 
Sexual Victimization of Males

 
Sexual Victimization of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer, and Transgender People

 
Social Media and the Internet as Tools of Sexual Victimization

 
Legal and Criminal Justice Responses to Sexual Victimization

 
Prevention and Intervention

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 9 • Intimate Partner Violence
Defining Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse

 
Measurement and Extent

 
Who Is Victimized?

 
Risk Factors and Theories for Intimate Partner Violence

 
Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence

 
Why Abusive Relationships Continue

 
Criminal Justice System Responses to Intimate Partner Violence

 
Legal and Community Responses

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 10 • Victimization at the Beginning and End of Life: Child and Elder Abuse
Child Maltreatment

 
Elder Maltreatment

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 11 • Victimization of Special Populations
Victimization of Persons With Disabilities

 
Victimization of Persons With Mental Illness

 
Victimization of the Incarcerated

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 12 • Victimization at School and Work
Victimization at School

 
Victimization at School: Grades K–12

 
Victimization at School: College

 
Victimization at Work

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Chapter 13 • Contemporary Issues in Victimology: Victims of Hate Crimes, Human Trafficking, Terrorism, and Identity Theft
Victims of Hate Crimes

 
Victims of Human Trafficking

 
Victims of Terrorism

 
Identity Theft Victimization

 
Summary

 
Discussion Questions

 
Key Terms

 
Internet Resources

 
 
Glossary
 
References
 
Index

Supplements

Instructor Resource Site

study.sagepub.com/daiglevict2e

 

Password-protected Instructor Resources include the following:

  • Microsoft® Word® test bank that provides a diverse range of pre-written options as well as the opportunity to edit any question and/or insert your own personalized questions to effectively assess students’ progress and understanding.
  • Editable, chapter-specific PowerPoint® slides that offer flexibility when creating multimedia lectures and you can customize to your exact needs.
  • Carefully selected video and multimedia links that feature relevant interviews, lectures, personal stories, inquiries, and other content for use in independent or classroom-based explorations of key topics.
  • Access to full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected to support and expand on the concepts presented in each chapter is included.


“Daigle and Muftic’s Victimology offers a thorough state-of-the-art review of victimology. It is required reading for both junior and senior scholars interested in learning about the causes and consequences of victimization across the life-course.”

Eric Connolly
Sam Houston State University

“A solid, well-written, reasonably priced textbook that does well in covering the basics in the field of victimology.”

Barbara Carson
Minnesota State University

“For an undergraduate course, this is the most thorough text I have seen for victimology. I would recommend it over others because it has a clear scope and sequence, easily identifiable learning objectives, and excellent ancillary materials.”

Martha Earwood
University of Alabama at Birmingham

“This textbook is a comprehensive overview of the study of victimization. It provides students with a detailed look at the field of victimology in terms of the nature and extent of victimization, as well as explanations and responses to victimization. It is extremely well written and accessible to students. I appreciate the authors’ incorporation of current literature and detailed description of key concepts in the field. I highly recommend it for undergraduate victimology courses.”

Christina Policastro
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga