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The Social Self
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The Social Self

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September 1995 | 192 pages | SAGE Publications Ltd
Much discussion in recent years has centred on the status of the self, identity and subjectivity in the light of powerful arguments about the social origins of personhood. The Social Self presents many dimensions of the debate, spanning psychology, philosophy, politics and feminist theory, and provides a critical overview of the key themes involved.

The internationally renowned contributors examine the senses in which we are `social selves' whose very identities are intimately bound up with the communities and cultures in which we live. Drawing on Wittgenstein, Marx, Foucault, Bakhtin, Gilligan and MacIntyre, among others, the chapters show the diversity of influences that have shaped this exciting and controversial issue.

David Bakhurst and Christine Sypnowich
Introduction
Problems of the Social Self

 
Jerome Bruner
Meaning and Self in Cultural Perspective
David Bakhurst
Wittgenstein and Social Being
Ellen Watson
What a Vygotskian Perspective Can Contribute to Contemporary Philosophy of Language
Felix Mikhailov
The Soviet Self
A Personal Reminiscence

 
Christine Sypnowich
Death in Utopia
Marxism and the Mortal Self

 
Stephen Mulhall and Adam Swift
The Social Self in Political Theory
The Communitarian Critique of the Liberal Subject

 
Diana Coole
The Gendered Self
Helene Keyssar
Becoming Women/Women Becoming
Film and the Social Construction of Gender

 
Ian Hacking
Why Multiple Personality Tells Us Nothing about the Self/Mind/Person/Subject/Soul/Consciousness

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