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The Development of Sociological Theory
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The Development of Sociological Theory
Readings from the Enlightenment to the Present

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Social Theory

April 2017 | 552 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

The Development of Sociological Theory: Readings from the Enlightenment to the Present brings together excerpts from 96 original works by important theorists, from the roots of sociological thought through the contemporary and post-modern periods.  Noted theory scholar Javier Treviño has created an anthology with breadth and variety, while staying mainly within theoretical schools and traditions that are sociological. The selections have been selected and edited for classroom use and are presented according to two orderings—as a rough chronology that illustrates the historical development of theoretical knowledge in sociology and as a typology of systems of sociological theorizing for more methodical consideration. 

 

 
PART I. THE NATURE, STRUCTURE, AND TYPES OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
On Intellectual Craftsmanship C. Wright Mills
The Importance of General Theory Talcott Parsons
Middle-Range Theories Robert K. Merton
Theory as Explanation George C. Homans
The Oversocialized View of Human Nature Dennis H. Wrong
The Theoretical Infrastructure Alvin W. Gouldner
 
PART II. THE ENLIGHTENMENT ROOTS OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
The Problem of Order Thomas Hobbes
The Social Contract Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Laws, Mores, and Manners Charles de Montesquieu
 
PART III. PROTOSOCIOLOGY
An Unjust Social Order Henri de Saint-Simon
The Hierarchical Structure of Society Henri de Saint-Simon
Order and Progress Auguste Comte
Law of the Three Stages Auguste Comte
Social Progress Herbert Spencer
The Evolution of Society Herbert Spencer
The General Happiness Harriet Martineau
Folkways and Mores William Graham Sumner
In-Groups, Out-Groups, and Ethnocentrism William Graham Sumner
 
PART IV. THE CLASSICAL TRADITION
Commodity Fetishism Karl Marx
Alienated Labor Karl Marx
Karl Marx
Historical Materialism
Émile Durkheim
Mechanical and Organic Solidarity
Types of Suicide Émile Durkheim
Social Facts Émile Durkheim
The Rationalism of Western Civilization Max Weber
The Spirit of Capitalism Max Weber
Types of Authority Max Weber
The Stranger Georg Simmel
Dyad and Triad Georg Simmel
The Metropolis and Mental Life Georg Simmel
 
PART V. THE INTERSTITIAL STATEMENTS
The Ruling Class Gaetano Mosca
The Circulation of the Elites Vilfredo Pareto
The Iron Law of Oligarchy Robert Michels
The Crowd Mind Gustave Le Bon
The Laws of Imitation Gabriel Tarde
The Herd Instinct Sigmund Freud
The Conscience of Society Sigmund Freud
Conspicuous Consumption Thorstein Veblen
Cultural Lag William F. Ogburn
Ideational, Sensate, and Idealistic Cultures Pitirim A. Sorokin
Imminent Sociocultural Change Pitirim A. Sorokin
The Pattern Variables Talcott Parsons
The Social System Talcott Parsons
The AGIL Schema Talcott Parsons
Manifest and Latent Functions Robert K. Merton
Social Structure and Anomie Robert K. Merton
The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Robert K. Merton
Structural Integration and Change Hans H. Gerth
Character and Conformity David Riesman
 
PART VII. THE CRITICAL EDGE
Social Structures, Social Conflicts, and Safety-Valve Institutions Lewis A. Coser
Class Conflict and Structural Change Ralf Dahrendorf
The Sociology of Knowledge Karl Mannheim
Hegemony Antonio Gramsci
The Reification of Consciousness Georg Lukács
Critical Theory Max Horkheimer
The Culture Industry Theodor W. Adorno
The Designer as Cultural Worker C. Wright Mills
 
PART VIII. THE SELF, INTERACTIONS, AND EXCHANGES
The Definition of the Situation W. I. Thomas
Self and Society George Herbert Mead
The Looking-Glass Self Charles Horton Cooley
Primary Groups Charles Horton Cooley
Performances in Everyday Life Erving Goffman
Managing Stigma Erving Goffman
The Meaningfully Produced Social World Alfred Schütz
Society as Objective Reality Peter L. Berger and Thomas Luckmann
Ethnomethodology Harold Garfinkel
Obligatory Exchange Marcel Mauss
Social Behavior as Exchange George C. Homans
Reciprocity, Power Imbalance, and Dialectical Change Peter M. Blau
Individual Interests and Systems of Exchange James S. Coleman
 
PART IX. COMMUNITY AND CIVIL SOCIETY
Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft Ferdinand Tönnies
The Quest for Community Robert A. Nisbet
Civil Religion in America Robert N. Bellah
A Normative Theory of Moral Community Philip Selznick
Communitarianism Amitai Etzioni
The Civilizing Process Norbert Elias
 
PART X. RACE AND GENDER
The Veil and Double Consciousness W. E. B. Du Bois
The Talented Tenth W. E. B. Du Bois
The Economic Status of Women Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Feminist Standpoint Theory Dorothy E. Smith
Black Feminist Thought Patricia Hill Collins
Performative Theory of Gender Acts Judith Butler
 
PART XI. SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS
Autopoietic Systems Niklas Luhmann
Lifeworld and Social System Jürgen Habermas
World-Systems Analysis Immanuel Wallerstein
The Network Society Manuel Castells
Actor-Network-Theory Bruno Latour
 
PART XII. LATE MODERNITY AND POSTMODERNITY
Sociological Intervention Alain Touraine
Structuration Theory Anthony Giddens
Ontological Security, Existential Anxiety, and Self-Identity Anthony Giddens
Habitus Pierre Bourdieu
Ulrich Beck
The Risk Society
Zygmunt Bauman
Liquid Modernity
Global Modernities Roland Robertson
The Postmodern Condition Jean-François Lyotard
Hyperreality Jean Baudrillard

“This comprehensive selection makes a powerful case for the importance of the sociological imagination. Treviño shows how theorists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries explored the ideas of community, power, culture, race, and gender…[and] how systems, networks, and information flows are seen as driving a transition from modernity to an emerging late modern or postmodern society.”

 

—John Scott, University of Essex (UK) and University of Copenhagen

John Scott
University of Essex (UK) and University of Copenhagen

"Treviño has succeeded in the quite difficult task of producing an anthology that includes all the major authors and currents of sociological theory. His introductions to the readings present them clearly and concisely.”

 

—Sandro Segre, University of Genoa, Italy

Sandro Segre
University of Genoa, Italy

“A. Javier Treviño’s erudition, thoughtfulness, and flair for pedagogy shine through in every aspect of this impressive, well-crafted volume: in its overall architecture, which neatly encompasses both historical chronology and thematics; in its judicious selection of texts, which span more than two centuries of the sociological tradition; in its careful textual abridgements, which allow essential arguments and insights to be easily accessible; and in its clear, elegant, and well-informed essays at the start of each section.”

 

—Mustafa Emirbayer, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Mustafa Emirbayer
University of Wisconsin–Madison

This book is fantastic. The idea of putting together pieces of classic sociological text in an order that make sense was quite genius. Since I believe there is only one way of thinking sociologically, I have always insisted that classical thinkers are more similar to each other than different. One may think that Marx and Weber are talking about two different things from two distinct points of view, however reading this books chapter in order, you would find out that they are quite similar.

Mr Peyman Hekmatpour
Sociology Dept, University Of Oklahoma
August 28, 2017

Sample Materials & Chapters

Part I

Part IV


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ISBN: 9781506304069
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