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Media and Crime in the U.S.
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Media and Crime in the U.S.

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October 2017 | 304 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

The rise of mobile and social media means that everyday crime news is now more immediate, more visual, and more democratically produced than ever. Offering new and innovative ways of understanding the relationship between media and crime, Media and Crime in the U.S. critically examines the influence of media coverage of crimes on culture and identity in the United States and across the globe. With comprehensive coverage of the theories, research, and key issues, acclaimed author Yvonne Jewkes and award-winning professor Travis Linnemann have come together to shed light on some of the most troubling questions surrounding media and crime today.

 The free open-access Student Study site at study.sagepub.com/jewkesus features web quizzes, web resources, and more.

 Instructors, sign in at study.sagepub.com/jewkesus for additional resources! 

 

 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
 
INTRODUCTION
 
CHAPTER 1 Theorizing Media and Crime
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
MEDIA “EFFECTS”  
STRAIN THEORY AND ANOMIE  
MARXISM, CRITICAL CRIMINOLOGY, AND THE “DOMINANT IDEOLOGY” APPROACH  
PLURALISM, COMPETITION, AND IDEOLOGICAL STRUGGLE  
REALISM AND RECEPTION ANALYSIS  
LATE MODERNITY AND POSTMODERNISM  
CULTURAL CRIMINOLOGY  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 2 The Construction of Crime News
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
NEWS VALUES FOR A NEW MILLENNIUM  
TWO EXAMPLES OF NEWSWORTHY STORIES PAR EXCELLENCE  
NEWS PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION IN A DIGITAL GLOBAL MARKETPLACE: THE RISE OF THE CITIZEN JOURNALIST  
NEWS VALUES AND CRIME NEWS PRODUCTION: SOME CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 3 Media and Moral Panics
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
THE BACKGROUND OF THE MORAL PANIC MODEL  
PROBLEMS WITH THE MORAL PANIC MODEL  
THE LONGEVITY AND LEGACY OF THE MORAL PANIC MODEL: SOME CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 4 Media Constructions of Children: “Evil Monsters” and “Tragic Victims”
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
CHILDREN AS “EVIL MONSTERS”  
CHILDREN AS “TRAGIC VICTIMS”  
GUILT, COLLUSION, AND VOYEURISM  
MORAL PANICS AND THE REVIVAL OF “COMMUNITY”: SOME CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 5 Media Misogyny: Monstrous Women
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
PSYCHOANALYTIC PERSPECTIVES  
FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES  
HONORABLE FATHERS VERSUS MONSTROUS MOTHERS: SOME CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 6 The Police Image and Policing the Image
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
THE MASS MEDIA AND FEAR OF CRIME  
THE POLICE IMAGE: TELEVISION AND FILM  
COPS AND REALITY TV  
POLICING AND SOCIAL MEDIA  
IMAGE MANAGEMENT  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 7 Crime Movies and Prison Films
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
THE APPEAL OF CRIME MOVIES  
THE CRIME MOVIE: MASCULINITY, AUTONOMY, THE CITY  
THE “PRISON FILM”  
THE DOCUMENTARY  
THE REMAKE  
DISCUSSION  
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 8 Crime and the Surveillance Culture
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
THE NSA AND A NEW AGE OF SURVEILLANCE  
PANOPTICISM  
THE SURVEILLANT ASSEMBLAGE  
FROM THE PANOPTICON TO SURVEILLANT ASSEMBLAGE AND BACK AGAIN  
“BIG BROTHER” OR “BRAVE NEW WORLD”? SOME CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 9 The Role of the Internet in Crime and Deviance
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
REDEFINING DEVIANCE AND DEMOCRATIZATION: DEVELOPING NATIONS AND THE CASE OF CHINA  
“ORDINARY” CYBERCRIMES  
HATE CRIME  
INVASION OF PRIVACY, DEFAMATION, AND IDENTITY THEFT  
EBAY FRAUD  
CHILDHOOD, CYBERSPACE, AND SOCIAL RETREAT  
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
CHAPTER 10 (Re)Conceptualizing the Relationship Between Media and Crime
• OVERVIEW  
• KEY TERMS  
DOING MEDIA-CRIME RESEARCH  
STIGMATIZATION, SENTIMENTALIZATION, AND SANCTIFICATION: THE “OTHERING” OF VICTIMS AND OFFENDERS  
• SUMMARY  
• STUDY QUESTIONS  
• FURTHER READING  
 
GLOSSARY
 
REFERENCES
 
INDEX
 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Supplements

Student Study Site
  • Mobile-friendly flashcards that strengthen understanding of key terms and concepts, and make it easy to maximize your study time, anywhere, anytime
  • Mobile-friendly practice quizzes that allow you to assess how much you’ve learned and where you need to focus your attention
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to certain full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected for each chapter. Each article supports and expands on the concepts presented in the chapter.
  • Video links and web exercises that bring concepts to life and make learning easier
Instructor Resource site

Password-protected Instructor Resources include the following:

  • A Microsoft® Word test bank, is available containing multiple choice, true/false, short answer, and essay questions for each chapter. The test bank provides you with a diverse range of pre-written options as well as the opportunity for editing any question and/or inserting your own personalized questions to effectively assess students’ progress and understanding.
  • Editable, chapter-specific Microsoft® PowerPoint® slides offer you complete flexibility in easily creating a multimedia presentation for your course. Each slide highlights essential content and features.
  • Lecture notes that summarize key concepts on a chapter-by-chapter basis to help you with preparation for lectures and class discussions
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to certain full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected for each chapter. Each article supports and expands on the concepts presented in the chapter.
  • Video links and web exercises that bring concepts to life and make learning easier

“The comparative component to this book is brilliant. The eloquent writing style coupled with the international comparisons make for an informative, eye-opening, and exciting read! I honestly wasn’t sure what I would think about the comparative nature of this book, but I simply love it!”

Brooke Gialopsos
Mount St. Joseph University

“The comparison between the UK and US helps further our mission of creating global thinkers.”

Jaimee Limmer
Northern Arizona University

“Accessible and engaging introductions to a wide range of theories, concepts, and critiques.  Good use of illustrative examples (including a variety of great new US and contemporary examples).”

Kevin Drakulich
Northeastern University

“This is the American version of the text I already use, and my students are primarily Americans. It is directly relatable to their experiences.  This text offers foundational knowledge that links criminological theories and media theories with an examination of relevant current and historical events.  Jewkes has made this material greatly relatable to an American audience while maintaining an international perspective.”

Mark Feulner
Florida State University

“The text is well written and articulates concepts in a clear manner. Chapters 2-4 present relevant real world examples that will allow students to draw connections between their own experiences/media exposure and course/text materials.”

Brooke Miller
University of North Texas

Sample Materials & Chapters

Chapter 1: Theorizing Media and Crime


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