You are here

Clinical Psychological Science

Clinical Psychological Science

An official journal of the Association for Psychological Science

Editor
Scott O. Lilienfeld Emory University, USA

Other Titles in:
Psychology (General)

eISSN: 21677034 | ISSN: 21677026 | Current volume: 7 | Current issue: 3 Frequency: Bi-monthly
A Journal for a New Era

A confluence of recent developments has made clinical psychological science increasingly central to all areas of psychological science, including:
  1. translational research, which recognizes that mental illness is grounded in disruption of basic psychological processes (e.g., cognition, emotion, socialization, personality, perception, learning, motivation, development)
  2. transdiagnostic approaches, which focus on disrupted processes that are common to different forms of psychopathology (e.g., sleep, emotion regulation and expression, attachment)
  3. empirically supported assessment, diagnosis, and treatment
  4. molecular and behavioral genetics and proteomics, which link common and uncommon variations in genes with behaviors relevant to psychopathology and well-being
  5. neuroimaging, which enables characterization of the integrity of neural networks and patterns of brain activation associated with normal and abnormal functioning and suggests new avenues for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects
  6. new treatments focusing on brain and behavior change (e.g., transmagnetic stimulation, direct neural stimulation, new drug and/or behavioral treatment delivery systems, gene-targeted therapies)
All of the above developments are rapidly changing the treatment of mental illness. The Association for Psychological Science’s journal, Clinical Psychological Science, emerges from this confluence to provide readers with the best, most innovative research in clinical psychological science, giving researchers of all stripes a home for their work and a place in which to communicate with a broad audience of both clinical and other scientists.

Clinical Psychological Science provides metrics that help provide a view of the journal’s performance. The Association for Psychological Science is a signatory of DORA, which recommends that journal-based metrics not be used to assess individual scientist contributions, including for hiring, promotion, or funding decisions. Therefore, Clinical Psychological Science recommends that these metrics be used solely for those wishing to assess this journal:

  • Mean review time: 43 days to first decision (learn more)
  • Mean production time: 53 days to online publication
  • 2017 average monthly full-text downloads: 12,336
  • H index 28 (learn more)
  • SJR indicator (2017) 3.281 (learn more)

The journals of the Association for Psychological Science are sold as a package.
View the details of the subscription package.

The Association for Psychological Science (APS) is the leading international organization dedicated to advancing scientific psychology across disciplinary and geographic borders. APS members provide a richer understanding of the world through their research, teaching, and application of psychological science. APS is passionate about supporting psychological scientists in these pursuits, which it does by sharing cutting-edge research across all areas of the field through its journals and conventions; promoting the integration of scientific perspectives within psychological science and with related disciplines; fostering global connections among its members; engaging the public with research to promote broader understanding and awareness of psychological science; and advocating for increased support for psychological science in the public policy arena. More than 30,000 leading psychological researchers, as well as students and teachers, have made APS their scientific home. www.psychologicalscience.org

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Clinical Psychological Science publishes advances in clinical science and provides a venue for cutting-edge research across a wide range of conceptual views, approaches, and topics. The Journal encompasses many core domains that have defined clinical psychology, but also boundary-crossing advances that integrate and make contact with diverse disciplines and that may not easily be found in traditional clinical psychology journals. Among the key topics are research on the underlying mechanisms and etiologies of psychological health and dysfunction; basic and applied work on the diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention of mental illness; service delivery; and promotion of well-being.

This broadly based international Journal sits at the interface of clinical psychological science and other disciplines, publishing the best papers from the full spectrum of relevant science. The Journal welcomes empirical papers as well as occasional reviews and associated theoretical formulations addressing the following:

  • Research from all areas of psychology and from all disciplines (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, psychiatry, public health, sociology) insofar as they relate to clinical psychology issues broadly conceived;
  • Basic research on the psychological and related processes that are disrupted in psychopathology;
  • Research on core areas of cognition, emotion, learning, memory, sensation, perception, and neuroscience that clearly addresses clinical phenomena;
  • Research related to clinical issues at all levels of analysis (from genes and molecules to contexts and cultures), using the full range of behavioral and biological methods, and incorporating both human and non-human animal models;
  • Research on specific clinical symptoms, syndromes, and diagnostic systems;
  • Studies with clinical patient populations as well as studies using non-clinical or pre-clinical populations that are relevant to understanding clinical dysfunction;
  • Basic and applied research relevant to clinical diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment;
  • Research focusing on precursors and risk factors for dysfunction as well as protective factors and resources that promote resilience and adaptive functioning;
  • Cultural and ethnic studies that advance our understanding of processes that relate to development of mental health or dysfunction; and
  •  Sophisticated, cross-cutting, and novel methodological, statistical, and mathematical approaches that enable advances in research.

These examples and all such approaches are critical components of the Journal. However, the very nature of what is meant by cutting-edge and the rapid advances in methods of assessment mean that its scope cannot be fully enumerated. The key criterion is that the research directly inform some facet of clinical psychology.

Editor
Scott O. Lilienfeld Emory University, USA
Associate Editors
Christopher G. Beevers University of Texas at Austin, USA
John J. Curtin University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Psychology, USA
Stefan G. Hofmann Boston University, Department of Psychology, USA
Kelly L. Klump Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Michael F. Pogue-Geile University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, USA
Kenneth J. Sher University of Missouri, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
Erin B. Tone Georgia State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Managing Editor
Rodney Atkins Association for Psychological Science
Consulting Editors
Gerhard Andersson Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sweden
Timothy Baker University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, USA
Yair Bar-Haim Tel Aviv University, Department of Psychology
Deanna Barch Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Radiology
Theodore Beauchaine The Ohio State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Denny Borsboom University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, the Netherlands
Joshua Buckholtz Harvard University, Department of Psychology, USA
Charles Carver University of Miami, Department of Psychology, USA
Avshalom Caspi Duke University, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, USA
Laurie Chassin Arizona State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Alex Cohen Louisiana State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Rachel V. Cooper Lancaster University, Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, UK
Mark R. Dadds University of Sydney, Department of Clinical Psychology, Australia
Timothy Dalgleish UK Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, UK
Rudi de Raedt Ghent University, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Belgium
Danielle Dick Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Psychology, USA
Kenneth A. Dodge Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy, USA
Susan Essock Columbia University, Department of Psychiatry, USA
Kim Felmingham University of Melbourne, School of Psychological Sciences, Australia
Elaine Fox University of Oxford, Department of Experimental Psychology, UK
Richard G. Frank Harvard Medical School, Department of Health Care Policy, USA
Eileen Gambrill University of California, Berkeley School of Social Welfare, USA
Brandon E. Gibb Binghamton University, Department of Psychology, USA
Eva Gilboa-Schechtman Bar-Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Israel
Charles F. Gillespie Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, USA
Sandra A. Graham-Bermann University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, USA
James J. Gross Stanford University, Department of Psychology, USA
June Gruber University of Colorado, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, USA
Kate L. Harkness Queen’s University, Department of Psychology, Canada
Allison G. Harvey University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology, USA
Nick Haslam University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Elizabeth P. Hayden University of Western Ontario, Department of Psychology, Canada
Dirk Hermans University of Leuven, Center for the Psychology of Learning and Experimental Psychopathology, Belgium
Jonathan D. Huppert The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Psychology, Israel
Sheri L. Johnson University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology, USA
Jutta Joormann Yale University, Department of Psychology, USA
Ronald Kessler Harvard Medical School, Department of Health Care Policy, USA
Merel Kindt University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, the Netherlands
Daniel N. Klein Stony Brook University, Department of Psychology, USA
Ann M. Kring University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology, USA
Annette M. La Greca University of Miami, Department of Psychology, USA
Robert D. Latzman Georgia State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Wolfgang Lutz University of Trier, Department of Psychology, Germany
Steven Jay Lynn Binghamton University, Department of Psychology, USA
Colin MacLeod University of Western Australia, Department of Psychology, Australia
David K. Marcus Washington State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Andrew Mathews King's College London, Department of Psychology, UK
Katie McLaughlin University of Washington, Department of Psychology, USA
Richard J. McNally Harvard University, Department of Psychology, USA
Harald Merckelbach Maastricht University, Department of Psychology, the Netherlands
Tanja Michael Saarland University, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Germany
Jeanne Miranda University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, USA
Terrie Moffitt Duke University, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, USA and King's College London, Department of Psychology, UK
Michelle Moulds University of New South Wales, Department of Psychology, Australia
Arthur M. Nezu Drexel University, Department of Psychology, USA
Matthew K. Nock Harvard University, Department of Psychology, USA
Keith Nuechterlein University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology, USA
Bunmi O. Olatunji Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
Thomas Olino Temple University, Department of Psychology, USA
Thomas Oltmanns Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, USA
Lisa Onken National Institute on Drug Abuse, Behavioral and Integrative Treatment Branch, USA
Henry Otgaar Maastricht University, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, the Netherlands
Lawrence Patihis University of Southern Mississippi, Department of Psychology, USA
Christopher Patrick Florida State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Paul Pauli University of Wuerzburg, Department of Psychology, Germany
Carol B. Peterson University of Minnesota, Department of Psychiatry, USA
Daniel Pine National Institute of Mental Health, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience, USA
Mitchell Prinstein University of North Carolina, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, USA
Michael C. Roberts University of Kansas, Department of Psychology, USA
David Rosenfeld Southern Methodist University, Department of Psychology, USA
Martin Sellbom University of Otago, Department of Psychology, New Zealand
Patrick Shrout New York University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jasper Smits University of Texas at Austin, Department of Psychology, USA
Bonnie Spring Northwestern University, Department of Preventive Medicine, USA
Dan J. Stein University of Cape Town, Department of Psychiatry, South Africa
Gregory P. Strauss University of Georgia, Department of Psychology, USA
Stephen Suomi National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, USA
Bethany A. Teachman University of Virginia, Department of Psychology, USA
Andrew Tomarken Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jessica Tracy University of British Columbia, Department of Psychology, Canada
Michael T. Treadway Emory University, Department of Psychology, USA
Timothy Trull University of Missouri, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
Lucina Uddin University of Miami, Department of Psychology, USA
Marcel van den Hout Utrecht University, Department of Psychology, the Netherlands
Irwin D. Waldman Emory University, Department of Psychology, USA
David Watson University of Notre Dame, Department of Psychology, USA
John Weisz Harvard University, Department of Psychology, USA
Thomas A. Widiger University of Kentucky, Department of Psychology, USA
Reinout Wiers University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, the Netherlands
Jennifer Wildes University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, USA
Katie Witkiewitz University of New Mexico, Department of Psychology, USA
Aidan G.C Wright University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, USA
Peter Zachar Auburn University at Montgomery, Department of Psychology, USA
Richard E. Zinbarg Northwestern University, Department of Psychology, USA
  • ProQuest
  • PsycINFO
  • For submission guidelines, please visit the APS site:

    http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/journals/clinical/2016-clinical-submission-guidelines

    Read the latest editorial policies from the APS Publications Committee.

     

    Institutional subscriptions are available as part of the Psychological Science Package. Click here for more information.

    Individual subscriptions are available by becoming a member of the Association for Psychological Science. Click here for information on becoming a member of the APS.

    Institutional, Single Print Issue