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BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies

BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies


Editors
Ravi S Vasudevan Centre for the Study of Developing Societies/SARAI, India
Rosie Thomas University of Westminister, UK
S V Srinivas Azim Premji University, Bengaluru, India
Debashree Mukherjee Columbia University, USA
Lotte Hoek University of Edinburgh, Scotland


eISSN: 0976352X | ISSN: 09749276 | Current volume: 9 | Current issue: 1 Frequency: Bi-annually

An early and popular form of film projector, "bioscope", was widely used to refer to the cinema in twentieth century South Asia. By focusing on the word's component parts, we highlight the expanding spectrum of forms involved in thinking about the relationship of life to visual and sound technologies. From the orbit of film, television and video, we invite research into a wide historical and contemporary canvas, from precinematic forms of assembly, through to contemporary computer practices, game cultures, multimedia telephony, ambient television, surveillance cameras, and the wide range of materials assembled on the internet. Our interests also extend to new media arts and contemporary screen-based art installations.

BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies is a blind peer-reviewed journal published biannually, starting January 2010. We encourage theoretical and empirical research both on located screen practices and wider networks, linkages, and patterns of circulation. This involves research into the historical, regional, and virtual spaces of screen cultures, including globalized and multi-sited conditions of production and circulation.

There is special attention given to archival research and field work. This includes documentation and ethnographic enquiry into media institutions and industries, and their modes of regulation, for example, the policies, debates and practices of urban administration, censorship regimes, and intellectual property regulation.

Our concern with old and new media forms invites work not only on changing technologies, but also on the spaces within which media experience is organized, including changing architecture and design and an enquiry into spatial forms and histories.

Our attention extends to the rich intersection of South Asian screen practices with related media forms, for example musical recording and performance, popular print culture and stage set design, and the history of publicity, advertising and consumer cultures.

To engage the specific idioms and forms of screen culture, we invite translations of important texts on screen experience as these are made available through writings on visual and sound cultures and technologies such as reviews, criticism, essays, and literary works.

BioScope is supported by the Sarai Programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, India, and the India Media Centre, School of Media, Arts and Design, University of Westminster, UK. is supported by the Sarai Programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, India, and the India Media Centre, School of Media, Arts and Design, University of Westminster, UK.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

An early and popular form of film projector, “bioscope”, was widely used to refer to the cinema in twentieth century South Asia. By focusing on the word’s component parts, we highlight the expanding spectrum of forms involved in thinking about the relationship of life to visual and sound technologies. From the orbit of film, television and video, we invite research into a wide historical and contemporary canvas, from precinematic forms of assembly, through to contemporary computer practices, game cultures, multimedia telephony, ambient television, surveillance cameras, and the wide range of materials assembled on the internet. Our interests also extend to new media arts and contemporary screen-based art installations.

BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies is a blind peer-reviewed journal published biannually, starting January 2010. We encourage theoretical and empirical research both on located screen practices and wider networks, linkages, and patterns of circulation. This involves research into the historical, regional, and virtual spaces of screen cultures, including globalized and multi-sited conditions of production and circulation.

There is special attention given to archival research and field work. This includes documentation and ethnographic enquiry into media institutions and industries, and their modes of regulation, for example, the policies, debates and practices of urban administration, censorship regimes, and intellectual property regulation.

Our concern with old and new media forms invites work not only on changing technologies, but also on the spaces within which media experience is organized, including changing architecture and design and an enquiry into spatial forms and histories.

Our attention extends to the rich intersection of South Asian screen practices with related media forms, for example musical recording and performance, popular print culture and stage set design, and the history of publicity, advertising and consumer cultures.

To engage the specific idioms and forms of screen culture, we invite translations of important texts on screen experience as these are made available through writings on visual and sound cultures and technologies such as reviews, criticism, essays, and literary works.

Associate Editors
Vebhuti Duggal Ambedkar University, Delhi 
Kartik Nair Temple University, USA
Salma Siddique Ludwig Maximilian University-Munich, Germany
Editorial Advisors
Iftikhar Dadi Cornell University, USA
Nitin Govil University of Southern California, USA
Steve Hughes School of Oriental and African Studies, UK
Priya Jaikumar University of Southern California, USA
Ranjani Mazumdar Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
Zakir Hossain Raju Independent University, Bangladesh
Editorial Board
Richard Allen New York University, USA
Ira Bhaskar Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
Moinak Biswas Jadavpur University, India
Corey Creekmur The University of Iowa, USA
David Desser Emeritus Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Christine Gledhill University of Sunderland, UK
Lalitha Gopalan The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Jyotindra Jain Editor, Marg Publications, Mumbai, India
Laleen Jayamanne The University of Sydney, Australia
Neepa Majumdar University of Pittsburgh, USA
Gina Marchetti University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
M Madhava Prasad English and Foreign Language University, India
Ashish Rajadhyaksha Centre for the Study of Culture and Society, India
Arvind Rajagopal New York University, USA
Robert P Stam New York University, USA
Ravi Sundaram Centre for the Study of Developing Societies/SARAI, India
  • Bibliography of Asian Studies (BAS)
  • CCC
  • Clarivate Analytics: Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI)
  • DeepDyve
  • Dutch-KB
  • Indian Citation Index (ICI)
  • J-Gate
  • OCLC
  • Portico
  • Pro-Quest-RSP
  • SCOPUS
  • UGC
  • 1. Article submissions should be in MS Word format. All submissions and editorial correspondence should be sent by soft copy to the Editors, Bioscope at bioscope2009@gmail.com

    2. Each journal paper should be accompanied by the affiliations, postal and e-mail address of the contributor(s).

    3. Keywords and an abstract of around 200 words must be provided at the time of submission of articles.

    4. The use of British spellings should be consistent throughout the article. Use “s” spellings instead of “z” spellings.

    5. Single quotes should be used throughout. Double quotes should only be used within double quotes.
    Spellings of words in quotations should not be changed. Quotations of 45 words or more should be indented from the text and separated with one line space above and below.

    6. Each endnote used in the article should contain more than a mere reference.

    7. The style for writing numerical expressions should be made consistent throughout the manuscript. For example, the style of referring to centuries (nineteenth century), decades (1960s), numerical ranges (1965-1969 or 234-256) and spelling out numbers from one to nine and using numerals for 10 and above.

    8. All Figures and Tables should be cited in the text. Source citations with tables and figures are required irrespective of whether or not they require permissions.

    9. All photographs and scanned images should have a resolution of minimum 300 dpi/1500 pixels and their format should be TIFF or JPEG. Due permissions should be taken for copyright protected photographs / images. Even for photographs / images available in the public domain, it should be clearly ascertained whether or not their reproduction requires permission for purposes of publishing (which is a profit-making endeavor). All photographs / scanned images should be provided separately in a folder along with the main article.

    10. Citations: The reference to other works should be provided in the text using citations written in the author-date method e.g., (Jones, 1998).

    11. Citation styles:

    One Work by One Author: (Walker, 2000)

    One Work by Multiple Authors: (Walker and Wasserstein, 2000)

    One Work by Three or More Authors: The surnames of all the authors have to be cited in the first instance. Thenceforth, only the surname of the first author should be cited, followed by et al. For example: First instance: (Wasserstein, Zappulla, Rosen, Gerstman, and Rock, 1994). After that: (Wasserstein et al., 1994)

    One Work by Six or More Authors: Only the surname of the first author followed by et al. is to be cited even in the first citation.

    Works with No Author: Cite the fist few words of the reference list entry (usually the title) and the year, for example, ("Study Finds", 1982).Two or More Works by Different authors in One Citation: (Balda, 1980; Kamil, 1988; Pepperberg & Funk, 1990)

    Two or More Works by the Same Author(s) in One Citation: ( Edeline & Weinberger, 1991, 1993)

    Two or More Works Published in the Same Year by the Same Author(s): (Johnson, 1991a, 1991b, 1991c)

    Authors With the Same Last Name: To prevent confusion, use first initials with the last names: (E. Johnson, 2001; L. Johnson, 1998).

    Work discussed in secondary source: In the text, name the original work, and give a citation for the secondary source. For example, if Seidenberg and McClelland's work is cited in Coltheart et al. and you did not read the original work, list the Coltheart et al. reference in the References. In the text, use the following citation: In Seidenberg and McClelland's study (as cited in Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins, & Haller, 1993)....

    Films: (Name of the Director, Year of release)

    12. References: A consolidated listing of all books, articles, essays, theses, and documents referred to (including any referred to in the tables, graphs, and maps) should be provided at the end of the article.

    Inverted names: In each reference, authors' names are inverted (last name first) for all authors(first, second, or subsequent ones); give the last name and initials for all authors of a particular work unless the work has more than six authors. If the work has more than six authors, list the first sixauthors and then use et al. after the sixth author's name.

    Arrangement of references: Reference list entries should be alphabetized by the last name of the first author of each work.

    Chronological listing: If you have more than one work by the same author(s), list them in order by the year of publication, starting with the earliest.

    Sentence case: In references, follow sentence case for the titles of papers, books, articles, etc.

    Title case: In references, Journal titles are put in title case.

    13. Reference styles:

    References to be set according to American Psychological Association (6th edition)

    Book

    Calfee, R. C., & Valencia, R. R. (1991). APAguide to preparing manuscripts for journal publication. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

    Article in an edited book

    O'Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men's and women's gender role journeys: Metaphor for healing, transition, and transformation. In B. R. Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issues across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). New York: Springer.

    Conference Proceedings

    Schnase, J. L., & Cunnius, E. L. (Eds). (1995). Proceedings from CSCL '95: The First International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

    Article from the web

    Bernstein, M. (2002). 10 tips on writing the living Web. A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites, 149. Retrieved from http:/www.alistapart.com/articles/writeliving

    Journal Article

    Scruton, R. (1996). The eclipse of listening. The New Criterion, 15(30), 5-13.

    Newspaper Article

    Schultz, S. (2005, December 28). Calls made to strengthen state energy policies. The Country Today, pp. 1A, 2A.

    Films

    Zhang, Y. (Director). (2000). Not one less [Motion picture]. China: (Country), Mandarin (Language)

    Publication ethics

    SAGE is committed to upholding the integrity of the academic record. We encourage authors to refer to the Committee on Publication Ethics’ International Standards for Authors and view the Publication Ethics page on the SAGE Author Gateway

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