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Effective Communication in Criminal Justice
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Effective Communication in Criminal Justice



June 2018 | 320 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

“This text provides students and instructors with a detailed examination of communication in the criminal justice system. Specific issues confronting criminal justice practitioners in their daily activities, including interactions with the public, are explored. The text demonstrates appropriate methods of communication and provides direction for overcoming difficulties in the communication process.”
—Brooke Miller, PhD, University of North Texas

“I would certainly describe this book as a must-have as an addition to any course that has a writing component. The information contained is necessary for students of criminology . . . [and] will aid students in formal writing as well as those going into the criminal justice field.”
—Dianne Berger-Hill, MAS, Old Dominion University

Effective Communication in Criminal Justice is the perfect companion for any criminal justice course that discusses communication and writing. Authors Robert E. Grubb and K. Virginia Hemby teach students how to be both effective writers and communicators—essential skills for anyone interested in criminal justice. Going beyond report writing, this book helps readers become more confident presenters and digital communicators while encouraging students to adapt their communication styles to meet the needs of diverse populations. Students will not only improve their communication and writing skills but also gain specific strategies for succeeding in careers related to policing, courts, corrections, and private security.  

 

 
Part I. The Basics of Effective Communication
 
1. Communication: Words Are Not Enough
The Role of Communication in Law Enforcement  
What Is Communication?  
Communication Styles  
Communication Across Generations  
 
2. Think Before You Speak: The Verbal Component
Verbal Communication: The Oral Component  
Listening  
Criminal Justice Professionals and Oral Communication  
Verbal Communication: The Written Component  
Verbal Communication: The Video Component  
 
3. Actions Speak Louder Than Words: Nonverbal Communication
The Functions of Nonverbal Communication  
Interpreting Nonverbal Body Language in Criminal Justice Professions  
Limitations and Exceptions to Nonverbal Communication  
 
4. Grammar: A Lesson in the Basics
 
Part II. Preparing for Effective Communication
Parts of Speech  
Parts of the Sentence  
Punctuation  
Frequently Confused Words  
Abbreviations Versus Full Words  
Capitalizations  
Spelling Errors  
Fifty Most Commonly Misspelled Words  
 
5. Preparing to Speak: Presentations and Visual Aids
Purposes of Speeches  
Guidelines for an Effective Oral Presentation  
Organizing Your Presentation  
Using Visuals in Your Presentation  
Televised/Recorded Presentations (News Reports, Presentations, Updates)  
 
Part III. Effective Communication in Your Professional Sphere
 
6. Written Communication: An Agency’s Lifeline
Writing Principles for Report Development  
Words  
Sentences  
Paragraphs  
Reports in Law Enforcement  
Reports in Corrections  
Maintenance of Records  
 
7. Interviewing and Interrogating: Witnesses and Suspects
The Interview Process  
 
8. The Court System: Preparing for and Testifying in Court
The Courtroom Setting  
The Participants in the Criminal Courtroom Drama  
The Participants in the Civil Courtroom Drama  
The Grand Jury  
The Criminal Trial  
The Investigator/Police Officer’s Role in the Trial Process  
The Correctional Officer’s Role in the Trial Process  
The Officer’s Appearance in Court  
Testifying  
 
9. Technology and Communication: Tools of the Trade
The Chief Information Officer (CIO)  
Criminal Justice Agencies’ Internet Presence  
Body and Vehicle Cameras  
Smartphones  
Alert Systems  
Cybercrime  
Virtual Meetings  
 
10. Conflict Resolution and Other Special Forms of Communication
Conflict Resolution  
The Twelve Stages of Conflict Resolution  
Hostage and Non-Hostage Situations  
 
Part IV. Effective Communication with Different Populations
 
11. Communication with Diverse Populations: Ethnic/Cultural Groups and Children and Youth
Characteristics of Culture  
Dimensions of Culture  
Law Enforcement and Immigrant Cultures  
Law Enforcement and Minority Cultures  
Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication  
 
12. Communication with Special Groups: Cognitive, Physiological, Psychological, and Emotional Disabilities
Categories, Definitions, and Explanations  
Cognitive Disabilities  
Physiological/Physical Disabilities  
Psychological Disabilities  
Emotional Disorders  
Addressing the Individual—Not the Disability  
Service Animals  

“Comprehensive text on the significance of all aspects of communication in the criminal justice field.”

Katherine J. Ely
Lock Haven University

“This text provides students and instructors with a detailed examination of communication in the criminal justice system. Specific issues confronting criminal justice practitioners in their daily activities, including interactions with the public, are explored. The text demonstrates appropriate methods of communication and provides direction for overcoming difficulties in the communication process.”

Brooke Miller, Ph.D.
University of North Texas

“I would certainly describe this book as a must have as an addition to any course that has a writing component. The information contained thus far is necessary for students of criminology…will aid students in formal writing as well as those going into the criminal justice field”

Dianne Berger-Hill, MAS
Old Dominion University, Sociology and Criminal Justice Department

“This text provides faculty teaching justice studies communications courses with a practical approach to both foundational issues necessary for all communications courses, as well as the sections specific to the justice studies field.”

Dr. James C. Brown, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
Utica College

“To be quite honest, I was excited about the ideas I had while previewing the text.  I would strongly encourage colleagues to consider using this in the construction of a course focused on “Writing in the Discipline”.  I think there is great potential for students (and instructors) to have fun writing while not realizing that they are actually learning valuable information.”

Lauren M. Barrow, Ph.D.
Chestnut Hill College

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ISBN: 9781506392134
£35.99