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Criminological Theory
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Criminological Theory
The Essentials

Third Edition
Additional resources:


May 2018 | 304 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

“I think this book does an absolutely fantastic job at capturing the balance between ‘quality versus quantity’ of coverage.”
—Adam Trahan, University of North Texas

Criminological Theory: The Essentials, Third Edition offers students a brief yet comprehensive overview of classic and contemporary criminologists and their theories. Putting criminological theory in context, acclaimed author Stephen G. Tibbetts examines policy implications brought about by theoretical perspectives to demonstrate to students the practical application of theories to contemporary social problems. 

New to the Third Edition:

  • A new chapter dedicated entirely to feminist perspectives (Chapter 10) introduces students to feminist models of crime while underscoring the importance of examining the related research.
  • Case studies that examine offender motives are now included to help students apply the theories discussed to interesting and memorable examples.
  • Policy is now integrated into each section to allow students to see the practical policy implications of each theory. 
  • Coverage of critical topics has been expanded throughout to introduce students to important issues, such as the influence of employment on criminal behavior, the success of school programs in reducing delinquent behavior, and federal sentencing guidelines in regard to crack versus powder cocaine.
  • Statistics, graphs, and tables have all been updated to demonstrate the most recent trends in criminology.

Instructors, sign in at study.sagepub.com/tibbetts3e for a Microsoft Word test bank, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, Lecture notes, and more!

 
Preface
 
CHAPTER 1. Introduction to the Book: An Overview of Issues in Criminological Theory
What Is Criminology, and How Does It Differ from Other Examinations of Crime?

 
What Is Theory?

 
What Is Crime?

 
How Are Criminological Theories Classified? The Major Theoretical Paradigms

 
Characteristics of Good Theories

 
Measures of Crime

 
Rates of Crime

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 2. Preclassical and Classical Theories of Crime
Preclassical Perspectives of Crime and Punishment

 
The Age of Enlightenment

 
The Classical School of Criminology

 
The Neoclassical School of Criminology

 
Loss of Dominance of Classical and Neoclassical Theory

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 3. Modern Applications of the Classical Perspective: Deterrence, Rational Choice, and Routine Activities or Lifestyle Theories of Crime
The Rebirth of Deterrence Theory and Contemporary Research

 
Rational Choice Theory

 
Routine Activities Theory

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 4. Early Positive School Perspectives of Criminality
Lombroso’s Theory of Atavism and Born Criminals

 
The IQ Testing Era

 
Body Type Theory: Sheldon’s Model of Somatotyping

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 5. Modern Biosocial Perspectives of Criminal Behavior
Nature versus Nurture: Studies Examining the Influence of Genetics and Environment

 
Cytogenetic Studies: The XYY Factor

 
Hormones and Neurotransmitters: Chemicals That Determine Criminal Behavior

 
Brain Injuries

 
Central and Autonomic Nervous System Activity

 
Biosocial Approaches to Explaining Criminal Behavior

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 6. Early Social Structure and Strain Theories of Crime
Early Theories of Social Structure: Early to Mid-1800s

 
Strain Theories

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 7. The Chicago School and Cultural and Subcultural Theories of Crime
The Ecological School and the Chicago School of Criminology

 
Cultural and Subcultural Theories of Crime

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 8. Social Process and Learning Theories of Crime
Learning Theories

 
Control Theories

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 9. Social Reaction and Critical Models of Crime
Labeling and Social Reaction Theory

 
Marxist Theories of Crime

 
Conflict Theories of Crime

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 10. Feminist Models of Crime
Feminist Theories of Crime

 
Key Terms in the Feminist Perspective

 
Key Issues in Research on Gender Differences in Offending

 
Types of Feminism

 
Critiques of Feminist Theories

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 11. Life-Course Perspectives of Criminality
Developmental Theories

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
CHAPTER 12. Integrated Theoretical Models and New Perspectives of Crime
Integrated Theories

 
Policy Implications

 
Conclusion

 
CHAPTER SUMMARY

 
KEY TERMS

 
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

 
WEB RESOURCES

 
 
Glossary
 
Index
 
About the Author

Supplements

Instructor Teaching Site

The password-protected Instructor Resource Site includes the following:

  • Microsoft® Word® test bank is available containing multiple choice, true/false, short answer, and essay questions for each chapter. The test bank provides you with a diverse range of pre-written options as well as the opportunity for editing any question and/or inserting your own personalized questions to effectively assess students’ progress and understanding.
  • Editable, chapter-specific Microsoft® PowerPoint® slides offer you complete flexibility in easily creating a multimedia presentation for your course. Highlight essential content, features, and artwork from the book.
  • Lecture notes summarize key concepts on a chapter-by-chapter basis to help with preparation for lectures and class discussions.
  • Sample course syllabi for semester and quarter courses provide suggested models for use when creating the syllabi for your courses.
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to certain full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected for each chapter. Each article supports and expands on the concepts presented in the chapter.
  • Web resources are included for further research and insights.
Student Study Site

The open-access Student Study Site includes the following:

  • Mobile-friendly eFlashcards reinforce understanding of key terms and concepts that have been outlined in the chapters.
  • Mobile-friendly web quizzes allow for independent assessment of progress made in learning course material.
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to certain full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected for each chapter. Each article supports and expands on the concepts presented in the chapter.
  • Multimedia resources are included for further research and insights.

“I think this book does an absolutely fantastic job at capturing the balance between “quality vs. quantity” of coverage.”

Adam Trahan
University of North Texas

Great Text and I can not wait to use this new version in my Criminal Justice Theory course.

Dr Frank Rodriguez
Criminal Justice Dept, North Carolina Central Univ
February 22, 2018

For instructors

This book is not available as an inspection copy. For more information contact your local sales representative.

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Paperback
ISBN: 9781506367897
£64.00