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Contexts

Contexts

An official journal of the American Sociological Association

Editors
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Managing Editor
Viewpoints Editor
Tressie Cottom Virginia Commonwealth University
Books Editor
Carson Byrd University of Louisville
Culture Editors
Kristen Barber Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
Catherine I. Bolzendahl University of California-Irvine
Trends Editor
Michael D.M. Bader American University
Policy Brief Editors
Web Editor
Design

Other Titles in:
Sociology (General)

eISSN: 15376052 | ISSN: 15365042 | Current volume: 18 | Current issue: 3 Frequency: Quarterly

About Contexts

Contexts is a quarterly magazine that makes cutting-edge social research accessible to general readers. It's the public face of sociology. In Contexts, you'll find the best sociological ideas and research; fresh perspectives, clear, concise thinking, and jargon-free reporting; and a thought-provoking look at modern life. It includes feature articles, culture and book reviews, and photo essays, as well as analysis of the latest social science research.

Who Should Read Contexts?

  • Anyone interested in sociological trends, social change, and the implications of sociological knowledge for policy and public debate
  • Teachers, students, journalists, civil servants and policy makers seeking out important developments in social research
  • Social and behavioral scientists interested in the cross-fertilization of ideas and creative new thinking
  • All sociologists who wish to remain current and engaged with findings across the field

In each issue of Contexts you’ll find:

  • The best sociological ideas and research
  • Fresh perspectives, clear, concise thinking and jargon-free reporting
  • A though-provoking look at modern life







The American Sociological Association (ASA), founded in 1905, is a non-profit membership association dedicated to advancing sociology as a scientific discipline and profession serving the public good. With nearly 15,000 members, ASA encompasses sociologists who are faculty members at colleges and universities, researchers, practitioners, and students. About 20 percent of the members work in government, business, or non-profit organizations. ASA hosts an annual meeting with more than 6,000 participants and publishes 14 professional journals and magazines.

As the national organization for sociologists, ASA, through its Executive Office, is well positioned to provide a unique set of services to its members and to promote the vitality, visibility, and diversity of the discipline. Working at the national and international levels, ASA aims to articulate policy and implement programs likely to have the broadest possible impact for sociology now and in the future.

Who Should Read Contexts?

  • Anyone interested in sociological trends, social change, and the implications of sociological knowledge for policy and public debate
  • Teachers, students, journalists, civil servants and policy makers seeking out important developments in social research
  • Social and behavioral scientists interested in the cross-fertilization of ideas and creative new thinking
  • All sociologists who wish to remain current and engaged with findings across the field

In each issue of Contexts you’ll find:

  • The best sociological ideas and research
  • Fresh perspectives, clear, concise thinking and jargon-free reporting
  • A though-provoking look at modern life
Section Editor - Viewpoints
Tressie Cottom Virginia Commonwealth University
Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve Temple University
Section Editor - Features
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Section Editor - In Briefs
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Section Editor - Q&A
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Section Editor - In Pictures
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Section Editor - Books
Carson Byrd University of Louisville
Section Editor - Culture
Kristen Barber Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
Catherine I. Bolzendahl University of California-Irvine
Section Editor - Trends
Michael D.M. Bader American University
Section Editor - Policy Brief
Section Editor - One Thing I Know
Rashawn Ray University of Maryland-College Park
Fabio Rojas Indiana University
Editorial Board
Keera Allendorf Indiana University-Bloomington
Sofya Aptekar University of Massachusetts-Boston
Michael D.M. Bader American University
Kristen Barber Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
Christopher Todd Beer Lake Forest College
Catherine I. Bolzendahl University of California-Irvine
David Brady University of California-Riverside
Tristan Bridges University of California-Santa Barbara
Carson Byrd University of Louisville
Reginald Anthony Byron Southwestern University
Ben Carrington USC Annenberg, USA
Prudence L. Carter University of California-Berkeley
Youngjoo Cha Indiana University-Bloomington
Michael Juan Chavez California State University-Long Beach
Sergio Chavez Rice University
Margaret M. Chin CUNY-Hunter College
Cheryl Cooky Purdue University-Main Campus
Tressie Cottom Virginia Commonwealth University
Jonathan M. Cox University of Central Florida
Amanda M. Czerniawski Temple University
Georgiann Davis University of Nevada-Las Vegas
Dawn M. Dow Syracuse University
Sinikka Elliott University of British Columbia, Canada
Nicole Esparza University of Southern California
Judson G. Everitt Loyola University-Chicago
Joshua Gamson University of San Francisco
Mark D. Hayward University of Texas-Austin
Daniel Hirschman Brown University
Shamus Rahman Khan Columbia University
Sarah Esther Lageson Rutgers University-Newark
Jean Yen-chun Lin California State University-East Bay
Judy Lubin Howard University
Helen B. Marrow Tufts University
Kris Marsh University of Maryland-College Park
Joshua McCabe Endicott College
Paul-Brian McInerney University of Illinois-Chicago
Cecilia Menjivar University of Kansas
Ethan Michelson  
Kwai Hang Ng University of California-San Diego
Anthony Christian Ocampo California State Polytechnic University-Pomona
Anthony Paik University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Victor Ray University of Tennessee
Ashley Rondini Franklin and Marshall College
David Charles Schalliol St. Olaf College
Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve Temple University

Contributing to Contexts

Contexts is a general interest sociology magazine. The writing is crisp, the stories are engaging, and the magazine appeals to both sociologists and educated “lay” readers from mothers-in-law to university students, policy professionals, activists, and anyone who’s interested in insightful social analysis. We welcome contributions from social scientists, journalists, K-12 teachers, and anyone else who writes incisively and in an engaging style. We’re looking for insightful analyses. We welcome intellectual risk takers. We publish longer, feature articles (that go through a peer-review process) and shorter “department” articles selected by section editors. Please download our submission guidelines and read the section-specific notes below, then direct submissions and inquiries to the following:

 

 

Regardless of section, aspiring Contexts authors should expect an iterative process of editing with a professional editor and our editorial team staff. Your ideas will be honed and made legible to non-academics while retaining the rigor expected of any journal.

Features (3,000 words):

Our feature articles are written for a broad audience and are cleanly and clearly written, with no jargon, footnotes, or citations. They have much in common with the best of long-form journalism: They’re empirically and theoretically driven storytelling, teach readers new stuff, and they help us think differently about the world. Articles in Contexts look at why the world is the way it is and how it came to be that way. Before submitting, look over some recent Contexts articles.

Feature proposals should be two pages, with a 50-word summary of the main argument, the first few paragraphs (and, if appropriate, section headings), and five recommended resources (not references or works cited) and why each is appropriate for the interested reader. Do not send a full manuscript. Proposals are generally reviewed within 2-3 weeks; if we are interested in pursuing your proposal, you will be invited to draft a full manuscript and we may include notes on the directions we think would be most fruitful for your article. Please read our submission guidelines for a fuller idea of the feature process, including several rounds of editing.

Culture Reviews (1,300-1,500 words):

Our guiding principle is this section is “making meaning of people making meaning.” In practice, we consider a wide array of topics and approaches that seek to bring together visual and sociological explorations of the world around us. We encourage authors to show (not tell) us how a sociological lens on culture matters, answering a focused question about language, artifacts (such as media), and other symbolic productions. Please send a short description of what you’d like to write and what data sources you will use as a “pitch” for the section editors to review.

Trends (1,300-1,500 words):

Offers insightful analyses of a wide variety of trends: public opinion, culture and politics, demography, and trends within the field of sociology. Our goal is expose subtle nuances within broader trends, allowing the reader to think about important trends in ways. Please plan to submit a pitch including the topic and data sources you’d like to employ. If your piece is selected for publication, you will also need to provide data and mock-ups of your figures, knowing that our graphic design team will remake your graphics to fit with the journal’s style.

Book Reviews (1,300-1,500 words):

Contexts book reviews generally focus on a recent publication from a social scientist or function as comparative essays, bringing together two or three related books. Reviews should be opinionated and critical without being inflammatory. Please send your proposals to books@contexts.org.

Photo Essays (750 words, 10-12 photographs):

Contexts’ photo essays start with a proposal—a paragraph or two describing the sociological themes of the essay and several sample images. Keep in mind that all Contexts photo essays are printed in grayscale and that is how we will look at your proposal. The finished essay will require 750 words along with photos at least 300dpi (each file should be at least 1MB in order to print well in the magazine). You or a coauthor/photographer involved in the proposal must own the copyright to the images and be able to provide descriptive captions for each.

Policy Brief (1,000-1,500 words):

Contexts’ policy briefs address proposed or implemented legislation, critiquing its intentions and effects and offering remedies to improve or replace such legislation. The analysis should be grounded in sociological research. Send a 50-word proposal to editors@contexts.org. If your idea is greenlit for development, you will then provide a fully cited copy of the article to our team for review. If it is accepted, you will then remove the citations and footnotes, conforming the piece to fit Contexts’ style, and work with the editors on the final product.

One Thing I Know (750 words):

The back page of each issue, the One Thing I Know essay is intended to communicate a big-picture idea grounded in the scholarship and academic life of its author. It should, loosely, answer the question, “At this stage of your career, what is one thing you know about the social world?” Submit a 50-word proposal to the editors at editors@contexts.org.3

Orcid:

As part of our commitment to ensuring an ethical, transparent and fair peer review process SAGE is a supporting member of ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID provides a unique and persistent digital identifier that distinguishes researchers from every other researcher, even those who share the same name, and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between researchers and their professional activities, ensuring that their work is recognized.

The collection of ORCID iDs from corresponding authors is now part of the submission process of this journal. If you already have an ORCID iD you will be asked to associate that to your submission during the online submission process. We also strongly encourage all co-authors to link their ORCID ID to their accounts in our online peer review platforms. It takes seconds to do: click the link when prompted, sign into your ORCID account and our systems are automatically updated. Your ORCID iD will become part of your accepted publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you. Your ORCID iD is published with your article so that fellow researchers reading your work can link to your ORCID profile and from there link to your other publications.

If you do not already have an ORCID iD please follow this link to create one or visit our ORCID homepage to learn more.

 

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